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North Carolina Restaurant Hosts Titanic-Themed Dinner in Honor of 105th Anniversary

North Carolina Restaurant Hosts Titanic-Themed Dinner in Honor of 105th Anniversary


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One-hundred and five years ago, the British ocean liner Titanic sunk into the North Atlantic Ocean, and to commemorate the anniversary the North Carolina restaurant Spring House and the Winston-Salem Wine Market recreated the ship’s menu to give patrons a chance to dine in luxury — without the tragedy.

According to Tim Grandinetti, head chef at Spring House, the menus only slightly strayed from the original offerings of Titanic’s first-class dining salon.

“It’s an amazing menu, but we had to scale it back,” Grandinetti told Winston-Salem Journal. “For one course — which I think must have been the big course, the showstopper — they had lamb, duck, sirloin of beef, green peas, two kind of potatoes, rice and carrots. It was a hell of a course.”

Additional menu items included Oysters a la Spring House, Consommé Olga, chilled salmon, filet mignon Lili, and more.

The wines for the themed-dinner were selected by Beth Binder, manager of Winston-Salem Wine Market, and M.C. Jones and Katie Braswell of Mutual Distributing Company.

“We tasted a lot of wines and carefully looked at the menu in determining what we thought would go best with each course,” Binder said. “Everything I found in history suggested they served lots of French wines: Chablis, Burgundies and muscadet. The sixth course, punch Romaine, is a palate cleanser that I found the recipe for online. Supposedly, it is the actual recipe they used on the ship.”

To read more about what people ate and drank on the Titanic, click here.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


Of late, I have once again been in correspondence with third cousin Sue of upstate New York, a fellow family history buff. Our common ancestor is great-great-grandfather Friedrich Wirth, born December 4, 1831 in Dürkheim, Germany, who was a stonecutter (and just in today’s e-mail from Sue was the first time I heard he was also a sculptor) until immigrating to the U.S. When was that? What city did he end up in? When did he die and where was he buried? We don’t know, but surmise it’s somewhere in upstate New York like the rest of the clan. Sue, who has done a lot of research, including ship manifests, can find no record of his arrival, life, or death in America.

We know that his wife was Anna Margaretha Buehler (who went by Margaret). Sue discovered that Margaret, with children Anna and Friedrich, arrived Oct. 18, 1890 at the port of New York from Bremen. They traveled with two pieces of luggage. (Friedrich and Margaret’s daughter and Sue’s great-grandmother Catherina “Katie” arrived earlier, in either 1877-78 or 1886 in New York City.) Margaret died in 1900 in Schodack, New York.

Friedrich and Margaret’s ninth and youngest child, my great-grandfather Friedrich, is known to have arrived in America at age 14, also in 1890, and his parents died “soon after” according to my grandpa’s memoirs.

I’ve arranged a gathering of two if not three Wirth sisters in Oct. for Mom’s birthday and will pick their brains at that time.

If you’ve ever conducted family history research, or for that matter any research, you will empathize with Sue as she writes, “I have been going nuts trying to find his death record but I had decided he had come over earlier than his wife and younger children, based on the recorded years of emigration for the older kids.”

There have been certain times like that in my own research, where I just become completely obsessed about finding a particular piece of information, and draw a blank. If you have any info to provide, please share it.


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